In Search of Lost Time

[originalmente postado 21/03/2009 em http://spacecollective.org/trubers/4791/In-Search-of-Lost-Time]

In Search of Lost Time or Remembrance of Things Past (French: À la recherche du temps perdu) is a semi-autobiographical novel in seven volumes by Marcel Proust. His most prominent work, it is popularly known for its extended length and the notion of involuntary memory, the most famous example being the “episode of the madeleine”. The novel is still widely referred to in English as Remembrance of Things Past, but the title In Search of Lost Time, a more accurate rendering of the French, has gained in usage since D.J. Enright’s 1992 revision of the earlier translation by C.K. Scott Moncrieff and Terence Kilmartin.

Begun in 1909, finished just before his death in 1922, and published in France between 1913 and 1927, many of the novel’s ideas, motifs, and scenes appear in adumbrated form in Proust’s unfinished novel, Jean Santeuil (1896–99), and in his unfinished hybrid of philosophical essay and story, Contre Sainte-Beuve (1908–09). The novel has had a pervasive influence on twentieth-century literature, whether because writers have sought to emulate it, or attempted to parody and discredit some of its traits. In it, Proust explores the themes of time, space, and memory, but the novel is above all a condensation of innumerable literary, structural, stylistic, and thematic possibilities.

Proust died before completing his revisions of the drafts and proofs of the final volumes. His brother Robert edited the last three volumes, which were published posthumously.

source: Wikipedia

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